"Local is Global When Dealing with Health Inequalities."

The mission of our Center is to improve health of individuals and communities, locally, nationally, and internationally, by addressing health inequities through interdisciplinary policy-relevant research, interventions, and evaluations. 

EDUCATION

Our faculty and staff teach and mentor students both on campus and in the field. Our interdisciplinary Center fosters a collaborative, investigative environment that seeks to educate Duke students by providing experiences in working with our research teams and through individual mentorship.

RESEARCH

Multi-disciplinary research and rigorous evaluation provide the path to understanding health disparities, locally and globally. CHPIR values our long-lasting relationships with communities and organizations that allow us to understand health inequalities and changes over time.

SERVICE

At the core of many CHPIR projects is translating research into services, policy, and new interventions. The Center bridges research and service by adapting lessons learned between the US and international settings, bringing efficiency and innovative approaches to our work.


We are an instigator and facilitator of a broad range of health policy and health disparities research that addresses policy relevant issues.

Activities focus on population based health research, health systems research, and health intervention and evaluation research.

EXPLORE OUR RESEARCH

Population Based Health Research

Population Based Health Research

Health Systems Research

Health Systems Research

Intervention & Evaluation Research

Intervention & Evaluation Research

FEATURED PROJECTS

POSITIVE OUTCOMES FOR ORPHANS (POFO)

Population Based Health Research

The objective of this multi-country longitudinal study of orphaned and separated children in Cambodia, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, and Tanzania is to examine the influence of residential characteristics, caregiver characteristics, and culture, on: 1) children's behavior and emotional adjustment; 2) health status including health related quality of life; 3) learning and achievement outcomes; and 4) relationship outcomes.

DUKE CLERGY HEALTH INITIATIVE

Health Intervention and Evaluation Research

This study's mission is to understand and improve the holistic health of United Methodist clergy in North Carolina. Recent work has focused on analysis and dissemination of intervention results, positive mental health findings, and contributions to the literature on the interplay between physical and mental and spiritual well-being.

EPIC ALLIES: A SMARTPHONE APP FOR ART UPTAKE AND ADHERENCE AMONG YOUNG MSM

Health Systems Research

This multi-site study tests the efficacy of Epic Allies, a mobile phone application (app) that utilizes game mechanics and social networking features to improve engagement in care, anti-retroviral therapy (ART) uptake, ART adherence and viral suppression rates among HIV+ young men who have sex with men (YMSM).

Community Resources for Education and Wellness (CREW)

Health Intervention & Evaluation Research

CREW will provide a continuum of substance use screening, education and treatment services and wellness promotion for individuals living with HIV and minority MSM and transgender women regardless of HIV status. 

Addressing Global Health Needs Among Refugee Children and Families in Durham County

Population Based Health Research

This Bass Connections project serves as the pilot for an ambitious multidisciplinary effort to develop a culturally appropriate, robust healthcare model that can help reduce health disparities among some of Durham’s newest, most vulnerable community members.

FEATURED CHPIR NEWS

Quality Residential Care Measures Summer 2019 Internship – NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

Quality Residential Care Measures Summer 2019 Internship – NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

CHPIR is currently looking for one more Summer 2019 Intern! Details below:

– NO LONGER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS

CHPIR is looking for a student to work with a multidisciplinary team (consisting of a community psychologist, epidemiologist, population health researcher, and NGO program director) and is interested in improving the quality of residential care for orphan and vulnerable children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) through the development of a quality of care measurement tool.

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APPLY NOW! Summer 2019 Internships at CHPIR

APPLY NOW! Summer 2019 Internships at CHPIR

CHPIR is currently looking for Summer 2019 Interns for several exciting projects! Please see below for more detailed info about each position:

Time Frame: 8-10 weeks (40 hours/week) during the summer of 2019, with flexible starting and ending dates

Compensation: $2,000 stipend plus good learning experience with the CHPIR team

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NEW ARTICLE ALERT: HIV Testing and Mistaken Beliefs about Immigration Beliefs

NEW ARTICLE ALERT: HIV Testing and Mistaken Beliefs about Immigration Beliefs

When you have time, check out an article on the first Proyecto Luz project that was co-authored by a few of CHPIR’s and Duke’s finest: Sara LeGrand, Carla Mena, and Morgan Barlow.

https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs40615-019-00565-0.pdf

Abstract

Evidence suggests that migrants may underutilize USA health care because of misconceptions about immigration-related consequences of health care use. This study aimed to explore whether common misconceptions about the immigration consequences of seeking health care, receiving an HIV test, and being diagnosed with HIV were associated with participant self-report of never having received an HIV test. The study sample comprised 297 adult, sexually active, documented and undocumented Spanish- speaking Latino migrants. Participants completed a cross-sectional survey via ACASI. In multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for sociodemographic variables and HIV stigma, misconceptions about laws emerged as a strong predictor of never having received an HIV test (p < .001). Associations between participants’ endorsement of misconceptions and their HIV testing history suggest that incorrect perceptions of laws do deter some subgroups of USA Latino migrants from HIV testing. Identifying misconceptions about negative immigration consequences of engaging in important health behaviors should be a community health research priority.

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WHERE WE WORK:

We are a part of the Duke Global Health Institute (DGHI), joining them in their work to reduce health disparities.
Together, we recognize that local is global when dealing with health inequalities.


Are you passionate about improving health policy and health inequalities?

If so, consider joining us in partnership.

STAY CONNECTED WITH CHPIR:

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